Photographers: How to Write Your Website Investment or Packages Page

I recently received an email from one of my lovely email subscribers, a boudoir photographer, asking if I had a blog post or other resources on how to write an Investment page for a photography website.

I didn’t, but I thought that would make a great topic for a blog post, so here it is, my photographer friends! (Many thanks to Ashlee for giving me the idea.)

I know photographers have all kinds of ways of delivering their pricing information: some of you ask potential clients to reach out to request a pricing guide, others of you put detailed information about packages and pricing on your website, and still others say something like, “Packages start at X,” without getting into the nitty gritty investment details until the client reaches out to you personally.

What’s the best way to handle this on your website?  

Let’s discuss.

The First Thing You Need to Do

However you deliver your pricing information, one of the first things you must do is provide a clear path to buy, so your potential clients will see your Investment or pricing info page in the first place.

What does this mean?

A clear path to buy will look different depending on what you sell, and how you sell it.

Let me illustrate with an example:

If you were selling inexpensive sterling silver jewelry in the $20-$30 range, for example, you’d likely have just a couple of steps between the customer finding your website, loving what they see, and clicking on the “Buy Now” button.

That’s because $20-$30 is a relatively inexpensive price point. It’s not a huge investment that someone needs to think long and hard about, consult their significant other about, or weigh the pros and cons of.

They also don’t have to check 20 other websites to see what else is out there in the same genre of thing they’re getting ready to fork over their dollars for before they make a buying decision.

All they need to feel comfortable purchasing is a clear picture of the jewelry, a compelling product description and/or product size & specs, info about the return policy, and a readily available “Buy Now” button.

Those elements are likely already on the page they’re viewing the jewelry on, so the path from landing on the website to the actual purchase is mostly frictionless.

That’s an example of a clear path to buy.

If, on the other hand, the potential jewelry customer encounters obstacles – they have to search high and low for the return policy, or the product specs, or delivery info, or the “buy now” button – they will leave that website faster than green grass through a goose, because there are at least a thousand other websites out there selling nearly identical sterling silver jewelry at the same price point where the path to buy is simple and clear.

Implementing Clear Path to Buy on Your Photography Website

Why all this talk about a clear path to buy?

Because unless you provide a clear path to buy, your potential clients aren’t likely to stick around your website long enough make it to your Investment page. 

I want you to really think about this, and how it applies it to your photography business.

With photography, the path to buy is different than our silver jewelry example, of course, because the investment is much larger.

There are more steps involved in making a sale, more personal attention required, more wooing of the client necessary, and therefore a greater need for persuasive client communication.

It needs to be crystal clear and super-easy for the potential client to take the initial steps in your sales process – from the second they land on your website and decide they’d like to learn more, to filling out your contact form or emailing you for more information – or you may lose them.

If there are obstacles between your potential clients’ desire to learn more about your services & pricing, and actually getting that information, they’ll likely move on the next website in that long list of at least several dozen other photographers who do what you do that came up when they googled “wedding photography Cincinnati” or “Austin portrait photography,” or whatever search term they used to find you.

Don’t give them a reason to do that by putting obstacles in their way. Make sure the path to buy on your website is so easy a caveman could figure it out, so your potential clients can easily and intuitively find and read your Investment page.

Ok, you understand the importance of a clear path to buy. That’s the first step.

How to Write Your Investment Page

Now that you’ve laid out a simple and intuitive path for your ideal clients to your Investment page, what should go on this page?

This assumes, of course, that you share the details of your photography packages on your website, which is what I recommend.

I know there are photographers (and other service providers) who would disagree, but having pricing information on your site weeds out those who can’t afford your services, and saves you from having to field inquiries from them.

It pre-qualifies the inquiries you do get, which is better for everybody.

This is how I do it on my website. Which means I generally don’t get emails from folks who have a tiny budget for copywriting and marketing services. There’s no long, drawn out, back-and-forth between me and the potential client only to discover several emails or conversations in that I’m not in their budget, after all.

If you don’t want to share the details of your pricing info on your site, you can simply say “Packages start at X,” so potential clients have some idea what to expect.

An Easy, No-Fuss Investment Page Template

Just so we’re on the same page here, I’m going to share one possible template you can use.

There are many ways to write what is essentially the “sales page” for your service offering – and that’s what your Investment page is, by the way, a sales page for your service. (If you Google “how to write a website sales page,” you’ll find 18,100,000 results. Have fun!)

What follows is NOT the be-all, end-all, “you must do it this way or you will fail” Investment page template.

What this template IS, is a very basic, very simple way to write your Investment page so it’s more client-attractive & effective than simply slapping up your prices and calling it a day. It’s straightforward and quick to knock out, and you don’t have to be a copywriting ninja to make it work.

You can get this handled in an afternoon, then when you have the bandwidth and the funds, you might want to take a basic copywriting course. You can find them online for not a lot of money. (If you’re doing any amount of business online – and if your website is meant to generate client leads, then you’re doing business online – you’ll want to learn the basics of copywriting.)

Here’s the template in a nutshell:

  • A Headline That Makes an Emotional Connection with Your Ideal Client
  • Short Client-Focused Paragraph or Bullet Points
  • Your Package Details and Pricing Information
  • Social Proof/Testimonials
  • A Call to Action (including an opportunity for folks who aren’t ready to commit to a consultation to reach out to you for more information)

Start with a Headline That Makes an Emotional Connection with Your Ideal Client

First things first – you must know who your ideal clients are and what they desire in order to write compelling headlines (and to write the rest of your website copy too, of course).

It’s not within the scope of this blog post to go into detail about how to write headlines. You can find many, many headline formulas and templates with a quick Google search. If you want to check out the detailed blog post I wrote on this topic, you can do so from the live link right here in this sentence. : )

Short Client-Focused Paragraph or Bullet Points

Next you want to have a short client-focused paragraph or bullet copy that speaks to your ideal clients and what they want. The goal is to grab them by the eyeballs by demonstrating that you understand their fears, hopes, dreams, desires and goals related to the kind of service you provide.

You want to warm up and romance your potential clients before you start throwing prices at them. Otherwise it’s like asking someone to marry you on the first date.

Keep in mind, you are writing this page, like all your website pages, using client-focused copy. That bit is very important.  Write your website copy to address your potential clients’ needs, hopes and desires.

To see examples of client-focused headlines + first paragraphs I’ve written for creative clients, check out the “Web Copy for Creative Businesses” category of my writing samples page.

There’s only one true “sales page” there, but the principal in each example is the same: a client-focused headline + client-focused paragraph or bullet points BEFORE you introduce what you have to offer. Most of the writing samples in my “Web Copy for Creative Businesses” model that.

Your Package Details and Pricing Information

If you already have your package and pricing information on your website, it’s simply a matter of adding the other elements I’ve outlined here before and after your pricing info where appropriate.

Social Proof

Add a “what others are saying” or testimonials section with a few quotes from clients about working with you. This builds trust.

A Call to Action

Create your call to action based on what you most want your audience to do next. In the case of your Investment page, you’ll most likely want folks to reach out to you for more information or to set up a complimentary consultation.

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Here’s an example of call to action copy I wrote for a wedding photographer client a few years ago:

Ready to get started?

I photograph a limited number of weddings each year to ensure you receive the personalized service you deserve.

Contact me today for your no-strings-attached consultation to lock in your ideal date.

[Photographer email address & phone number here.]

Here’s one I wrote for a wedding photographer client more recently:

Want to get in touch?

To schedule a no-obligation consult or in-person meeting to discuss your special day & see if we’re a good fit to work together, please fill out my contact form here. I’ll get back to you within 48 hours during normal business hours.

Or feel free to email directly at [email address], or give me a call at [phone number].

I can’t wait to hear about your wedding plans!

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

For Potential Clients Who Aren’t Ready to Book a Consultation

Of course, some people who land on your Investment page are not going to be ready to book a consultation, but you still want to give them a next action to take.

They may be interested in your services, but have lingering questions about your pricing, your process, or if you’re a good fit for them before they commit to a one-on-one meeting or phone conversation.

To accommodate these folks, you’ll want to add a line that says something like, “Feel free to reach out to me with questions about packages & pricing, my complimentary consultation, or how I work. I’ll be happy to help you figure out if we’re a good fit.”

Your potential clients are afraid that when they reach out for more information, they’re going to get a sales pitch, so you want to alleviate that fear as much as you can in your Investment page copy.

In my copywriting business, I tell potential clients we can hop on the phone for a 15-20 minute no obligation conversation as a first step. I let them know that in this call they can share what they’re trying to accomplish with their website, and we can chat about my services and determine if working together makes sense.  That way they know there won’t be a sales pitch. This call is about me and the potential client exchanging information, and that’s it. No pressure, no hard sell.

Here’s that template again in a nutshell:

  • A Headline That Makes an Emotional Connection with Your Ideal Client
  • Short Client-Focused Paragraph or Bullet Points
  • Your Package Details and Pricing Information
  • Social Proof/Testimonials
  • A Call to Action (including an opportunity for folks who aren’t ready to commit to a consultation to reach out to you for more information)

Alternatively, you can write your Investment page like a straight-up Sales Page. Don’t worry, you don’t have to be aggressive or overly “salesy” when writing this copy.

Here are two resources you might want to check out if that’s the route you decide to take:

#1: The Naked Truth Sales Letter Formula. Many very wise and skilled copywriters recommend this sales page template, and I’ve used it myself for my own stuff occasionally. It’s one of the quickest ways to just get something down on paper you can work with to create a good sales page. (The article references writing a “sales letter,” but the principles are the same when you’re writing a sales page/sales message for your website.)

Some of you are going to take one look at that formula and think, “No way in h-e-double-hockey-sticks am I using that model to write my Investment page.” That’s fine, but do yourself a solid and take note of the timeless copywriting principles you’ll find therein.

#2: This is an article written by Amanda Genther called My 8-Step Process for Writing Sales Page Copy. It’s pretty darn good, especially if you’re writing your own sales copy for the first time.

Dos and Don’ts

Let me finish off this long-arse blog post with a few dos & don’ts.

I reviewed many, oh-so-many, wedding, portrait, boudoir, and lifestyle photography websites to see what my photographer friends are up to on their websites to prep for writing this blog post, and noted some good, and not-so-good, practices when it comes to Investment pages.

Here ya go:

:: Do call the page “Investment,” “Services,” “Wedding Packages,” or similar in the navigation menu/button copy. You can call it “Pricing” or “Price List” if you wish, because at least that’s clear, but I think “Investment” works better. The bottom line is, you want people to be able to instantly find your pricing & packages information. It all goes back to the “clear path to buy.”

:: Don’t call it “Details,” or “Information,” because it’s not immediately clear to people that that’s where they’ll find the packages & pricing info.  Remember, you want a smooth sales process, the fewer obstacles, the better.

:: Do make it about your client and their needs.

:: Don’t go on and on about your camera equipment or other tech-related photography stuff on the Investment page. Your potential clients don’t really care about that.

:: If you’re going to tell people to contact you from your Investment page (and you are), do give them your contact info ON THAT PAGE, or paste in the direct link to your contact page at the end of your Investment page copy.

You’d think that would go without saying, but I saw some version of this on several sites I looked at:

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Hello! Thanks for stopping by and checking out my website. I’d love to hear all about your plans for the big day! You can customize any of my photography packages. My base wedding package begins at $3,400, and all packages include image files.   

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

And that’s it, end of story.

There was no call to action directing folks to get in touch, and no contact information. You have to scroll back up to the main menu at the top of the website, then click on the “Contact” page nav button to reach out to the photographer. This is an obstacle in the path to buy. Ain’t nobody got time for that.

:: Do tell people about your process and how it works. Many photographers don’t do this, yet most people have never hired a photographer for anything, and are uncomfortable if they don’t have all the information about what to expect. So give them that. You can do this on an FAQ page, and link to the FAQ page from your Investment page with a call to action like, “Want to learn more about my process? Check out my FAQ page here to get all your questions answered!” or something similar.

:: Don’t refer to yourself in the third person, as in, “John is available for weddings worldwide.” It’s off-putting and creates a barrier between you and the potential client. Better to be warm, personable, and approachable by writing your copy in the first person.

:: If you ask folks to email you for pricing information, do say something like, “wedding packages begin at $3200,” or “portrait sessions start at $500,” or similar to give potential clients some idea of what to expect.  You don’t want to waste their time or yours if they have a maximum budget of $2000, and your lowest cost package is $3500.

:: If you do include detailed pricing information on your Investment page, lead with your higher priced packages for price anchoring.

Conclusion

And there you have it. I hope this resource helps you write an Investment page for your photography business that vastly increases the number of high-quality client leads you get.

Resources for Photographers

By the way, I’m launching a budget-friendly course for photographers, 30 Days to a Magnetic Marketing Message That Sells: A Course for Wedding, Portrait, and Lifestyle Photographers, in Fall 2017.

This course will help you determine who your ideal clients are and what your unique selling proposition or “meaningful difference” is, & teach you how to use that information to create a client-attractive marketing message for your photography business that helps you stand out in an overcrowded market, attract & connect with your ideal clients, & get more bookings.

Get on the VIP notice list to find out when the course launches right here.

For Photographers: The Simple Yet Powerful Website Copy Tweak That Will Win You More Clients (& How to Implement It)

photography web marketing

[NOTE: Though this post is geared to photographers, the principles apply to all creatives selling any kind of product or service.]

Photographers, I love you. Fine art photographers, wedding photographers, lifestyle photographers, product photographers, pretty much all of you.

For years, I wanted to be among you:  a working photographer, making a living from photography.  I chased this dream for some time.  I took a year-long course in photography at my local community college, worked for a local photographer as an assistant, then put together a portfolio and applied to the photography program at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. Lucky for me, I was accepted into the program. Unluckily, I decided art school wasn’t in the cards for me at that moment. I moved to New York anyway and went to “regular” college, taking a few photography courses during the three years I lived there between other commitments.

I share this with you because I want you to know that my heart is with you, that I’m not coming to you strictly from a place of sharing advice on how to write persuasive web copy that can help you win more clients in your photography business, but also from a place of big, full-hearted, sappy love for the work you do every day.

Now that we’ve established that, let’s talk about the simple yet powerful web copy tweak that can help you win more clients. But first . . . .

The Problem with Most Photography Websites

Many photographers make the serious mistake of assuming their gorgeous images will speak for themselves to sell their services and get clients, imagining that once a potential customer sees the talent evident in the online portfolio, they’ll immediately reach out and inquire about working together.

Unfortunately, this rarely happens.

While having a web presence and an online portfolio is a great first step, it’s not enough. The “build it and they will come” approach simply does not work online, where you’re competing with dozens, if not hundreds, of other photographers in your town who provide exactly the same service you do. And if you live in a big city, thousands of other photographers.

Since your potential clients can easily find at least two dozen other talented photographers whose images are just as stunning as yours with a simple Google search, you’re going to have to show them more than your gorgeous portfolio to get them interested in hiring you.

What Potential Clients Are Looking For

What a potential client is looking for when they land on your photography site is evidence that you clearly understand who they are as a client, that you have the solution they’re looking for, and that you, specifically, are exactly the person to provide that solution.  

In other words, they want you to be “the one.” They’ve been searching and searching online, and they’re feeling frustrated that they’ve already been to 12 other wedding photography/lifestyle photography/insert your photography specialty here websites, and they can’t distinguish one photographer from the next. They want to land on your site and think, “This is it, I’ve found the ideal photographer for my job at last. I can stop searching, cue the trumpets.”

This is why you get price-shopped, by the way. Because most photography websites look nearly identical to one another and most photographers provide similar services, the ONLY thing potential clients have to go on to distinguish you from your competition is your price, so naturally they’ll choose the person with the lowest price.  This is not the kind of client you want.

{To learn more about web surfing behavior and what potential customers are looking for when they search online for that thing you do, check out 7 Ways to Improve Your Web Copy Today for Better Sales: Basics for Creative Entrepreneurs. And pay particular attention to Item #2, where I share an example from the world of wedding photography.}

So how do you convey to your ideal clients that you’re the right photographer for their project? You do it through compelling, client-focused web copy. That’s the simple yet powerful website copy tweak that will win you more clients: CLIENT-FOCUSED web copy.

That may sound way too simple, but you’d be surprised how many photography websites don’t adhere to this simple, yet persuasive principle. (Lots of other kinds of websites don’t either, by the way, not just photography sites.)

Your web copy must connect with the reader/potential client and speak to what’s important to them as a photography client, as opposed to using company-centric copy that focuses mostly on the company, i.e., with language like “our goal,” “we have,” “we specialize in,” etc.

Because the edifying truth is, people don’t really care who you are, they want to know how you can help them. They’re seeking the answer to the question, “WIIFM?,” meaning, “What’s in it for me?”

So what you want your web content to do is make an emotional connection with your ideal clients through speaking directly to their desires, wants and needs in a way that makes them eager to do business with you.

Building the Foundation: How to Create Compelling Client-Focused Web Copy

To create persuasive web copy that effectively sells your services, you have to get the foundation in place first.  This is critical work that if left undone, will create frustration, vexation, and irritation (you can tell we love our thesaurus around here), loads of wasted time, and frankly, will attract more than your fair share of pain-in-the-butt, price-shopping clients. Ain’t nobody got time for that.

On the other hand, if you do the foundational work first, creating compelling web copy for every page on your site, from your Home page, to your About page, to your Services and Pricing pages, and everything in between, becomes a breeze.

This foundational work consists of:

#1: Figuring out who your ideal clients are so you can speak directly to them with a targeted and persuasive marketing message

#2: Determining what makes your work, your process, your services, or the way you do business different, better, more special, or more compelling to these ideal clients than others who do what you do, also known as your unique selling proposition

I cannot stress enough how important these two steps are to creating your compelling marketing message; everything flows from this.  It will inform everything else in your business, from the kind of clients you work with, to the services you offer, to how and who you market to, to your tagline and your client pitches, and lots more besides.

Stick with me, I’m going to tell you how to do this.

{If you want to read the story of the exhaustion, struggle and overwhelm I experienced in my business and how I resolved it by figuring out my ideal clients and unique selling proposition, check out Creatives: Are You Making These 3 Web Marketing Mistakes?}

Defining Your Ideal Clients

This is the fun stuff – where you get to dream up exactly the kind of person who would be perfect for your services and who you’d L-O-V-E to work with. 

Because the bottom line is, if you haven’t defined your ideal client/perfect customer/target audience, then you’re trying to talk to “everybody” with your web content – which means it’s most likely bland and boring and homogenous.  And that means that as lovingly crafted and well-written as it may be, it won’t convert the right readers into your dream clients and potential clients. Say it with me: bland and boring does not convert!

To find out more about defining your ideal clients, including the opportunity to download a free Defining Your Audience Checklist, check out The Dreadful Client-Repelling Mistake That Will Keep You Broke (and how to fix it). The downloadable checklist is at the end of the blog post.

How to Uncover Your Unique Selling Proposition

Once you’ve determined who your ideal clients are, you can begin to work out what your unique selling proposition is. Your USP is simply the collection of factors unique to you and your business that compel your ideal clients to choose you over someone else who offers the same product or service.  In fact, who you serve – your ICA or “ideal client avatar” – can be part of your unique selling proposition.

The benefit of a well-defined USP is that you’ll begin to connect with and convert your ideal clients, instead of ending up with the ones who make you want to plunge daggers into your eyes.  Because when a potential ideal client lands on your website and sees it’s not like the hundreds of photography sites they found when they were Googling that thing you do, they will stop and take notice, instead of trucking right on past your website never to return.

To find out how to uncover your USP, including the opportunity to download a free Defining Your USP Checklist, check out Creatives: How to Uncover Your Unique Selling Proposition (and why you need to). The downloadable checklist is at the end of the blog post.

In that post you’ll find a couple of examples of creative service providers doing differentiation right, so you can see what that looks like in the context of writing client-focused web copy. On a similar note, you might want to check out this guest post I wrote called 6 Authentic, Low-Cost Ways to Differentiate Yourself Online to Attract Your Ideal Clients and Customers.

Ok, So You’ve Figured Out Your ICA (Ideal Client Avatar) and USP (Unique Selling Proposition), Now What?

Once you’ve knocked out these two very important first steps, you’re ready to implement what you’ve discovered about your ICA and USP to create compelling client-focused copy on your web site. The foundational work you’ve now done makes this much easier.

I would start with the Home page and the About page first, because those are the two most visited pages on most websites.

(For more information on writing an effective About page, including a template created especially for creatives, check out For Creatives: The Secret to Transforming Your Boring, Lackluster About Page into an Ideal Client-Attracting Magnet.  At the end of that blog post you’ll have an opportunity to get the template I use to write About pages for clients, gratis, of course.)

Now on to the Home page. You want to think of your Home page as a virtual storefront – unless you provide a warm, welcoming, value-packed reason to come inside, people are going to walk right on by.

On the web, that means potential ideal clients will click away from your site faster than green grass through a goose if you don’t instantly demonstrate value and relevance to them.

Your Home page needs to: 

Convince busy web visitors on a mission to find specific, problem-solving information to stay on your site long enough to read further, find out what you’re about, and take some kind of action – such as checking out your products and services, signing up for your email list, or requesting a quote/more information, etc.

And because of the way people read and search on the web, you only have a few seconds to do this.

Here’s a down-and-dirty Home page checklist that will help you get yours in tip-top shape.

An effective Home page will do these 5 things:

1. Demonstrate that you understand your target audience’s problems

2. Offer a solution to those problems by sharing the benefits of what you have to offer, clearly, concisely, and compellingly.

3. Explain how solving the problem will improve your clients’ lives. See copywriting power tip #1, below.

4. Let your website visitors and potential customers know how you’re different from the competition and what makes you uniquely qualified to solve their problems.

5. Include a clear call to action. Very simply, this means giving them something to do next that will deepen the relationship with you, such as reading your blog or signing up for your email list, etc.

Remember, all the copy on this page needs to be client-focused. It’s less about you and more about your potential client’s wants, needs, and desires.

Your Home page will demonstrate what you can do to make your clients’ lives easier, better, healthier, richer, more successful or what have you, depending on the exact product or service you provide.

While the blog post linked up here is not strictly about Home pages, you’ll find some helpful advice on wooing and engaging potential buyers with web copy:  Why Most Product Websites Make Me Sad: The Good, the Bad, and the Unsightly.

For the fine art photographers reading this, I know you may think that these suggestions won’t work for you. If that’s the case, I suggest you check out this post I wrote on how you can apply copywriting principles to what you do:  Can Copywriting Principles Work for Visual Artists?

A Powerful Way to Reel ‘Em In: Three Bonus Client-Attracting Copywriting Power Tips

Copywriting Power Tip #1:  “Paint a Picture”

Whatever services you offer – wedding photography, lifestyle photography, product photography, even fine art photography – you need to help your potential clients and customers see the vision of what can be for them when they use your services or buy your work – their ideal outcome.

A very effective way to do this is to “paint a picture” with your web copy. Get the nitty-gritty details of how to do that here:  What a Personal Development Classic from 1959 Can Teach You About Writing Web Copy That Sells.

Copywriting Power Tip #2:  Inject Personality

One of the most common website faults among creative service providers is boring, bland, and flavorless web copy.  Remember, bland and boring does not sell.  And since bland, boring copy is a common malady all over the web, if you buck that trend, you’ll stand out – in a good way.

There are creative ways to invest even the most plain, utilitarian thing with personality through the use of compelling web copy. That said, creative services typically are not bland and boring, so your web copy shouldn’t be either. Copy with personality gets remembered, creates desire for your services, and more importantly, sells more effectively than homogenous, dull as dirt web copy.

This doesn’t mean you have to get crazy, mind you. If you’re more Josh Groban than David Lee Roth, then own it, and let that shine through in your web and other marketing.

To learn more about using personality in web copy, check out these two posts: How to Sell Any Boring Old Thing with Scandalously Good Copy and If You Can’t Beat ‘Em, Join ‘Em: The Baby Carrot Story and Using Personality in Marketing.

Copywriting Power Tip #3: Tap into the Power of Emotion

One of the most important pieces of advice I can ever share with you about writing compelling copy that persuades people to buy your creative services, is to tap into the power of emotion in your copy. Buying decisions are emotional decisions.  People buy based on emotion and justify purchases based on logic.

You may have heard that little bon mot dozens of times, but what does it mean in practice?

Think about chocolate cake.  Or Krispy Kreme donuts.  (Mmmm, donuts . . . as Homer Simpson would say.) If people acted rationally they wouldn’t buy these things – sugar is bad for you, it’s not nutritious, and it makes you fat – it’s nothing but empty, unhealthy calories.  But cake and donuts are both multi-million dollar industries because eating them makes you feel good.

So when writing your web copy, you want to make an emotional connection with your ideal clients that makes them feel good, or excited, happy, inspired, relieved, encouraged, understood, relaxed, or any one of dozens of other emotions, depending on the exact service you offer.

So, how do you figure out the deeper emotional benefit you want to tap into? One way to go beyond the surface benefits your product/service offers to get to the core emotional benefits your customers want is through the use of what’s called the “so what?” technique.  It’s simple, and it works.

Learn the “so what?” technique and how to apply it here: What Can Chocolate Cake and Donuts Teach You About Selling More?

The bottom line: you have to use client-focused copy to create an emotional connection – that’s how you stand out among all the other talented photographers online, and that’s how your right people will find you.

And there you have it, my talented photographer friends – the simple website copy tweak that will win you more clients: client-focused web copy, and how to create it.

I know this was a heckuva lot to take in all at once, so here are the steps again, simplified:

  1. Figure out who your ideal clients are and what they desire (I pointed you to a free downloadable worksheet for this)
  2. Determine your unique selling proposition (Ditto on the free downloadable worksheet)
  3. Use this information to create compelling client-focused web copy that speaks to your ideal clients wants, needs and desires, starting with the Home page and About page on your site

But wait, there’s more!

You might find this post I wrote on taglines valuable as you re-work your website copy to focus on your ideal clients. It’s a dead-simple formula for creating a tagline for your creative business in 20 minutes flat: Taglines 101: How to Create a Tagline for Your Creative Business.

Questions? Comments?  Leave ’em below! 

To get on the VIP List to find out when my upcoming course — 30 Days to a Magnetic Marketing Message That Sells: A Course for Wedding, Portrait, and Lifestyle Photographers — drops, head right over here.

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